Population of Homestead

A Homestead Headlines Article by Chuck Oldenburg

December, 2003

The 2000 census does not provide an answer to the question, “What is the population of Homestead Valley?” The Tamalpais/Homestead census district counted 10,691 people. An accurate count for Homestead Valley is unavailable. The U.S. government keeps detailed census data confidential for 70 years. One can estimate the population from the known number of dwelling unit sewer connections, 1040. Assuming 2.5 people per dwelling unit, the population would be 2600.

At this time, the only available detailed Homestead censuses are 1910, 1920 and 1930. Starting from zero in 1903, the community grew to 60 homes and 250 people in 1910. During the following decade, there was little growth. By 1920, there were only 15 more homes and 35 more people. 60% of the families living in Homestead in 1910 had moved away. During the 1920s, however, growth rate was much higher. In 1930 there were 131 homes with 441 people, a population increase of 55% in 10 years, but only 14 of the 1910 families remained.

The character of the community changed in some ways. The number of female heads of household increased much faster than the population, from 5 in 1910 to 8 in 1920 to 23 in 1930. The average age of the head of a household was 43 in 1910, 47 in 1920 and 47 in 1930. The working population was 34% in 1910, 41% in 1920 and 32% in 1930. The portion of white collar workers increased from 36% in 1910 to 41% in 1920 and 49% in 1930. In all three censuses there were more craftsmen than laborers.

The portion of heads of household that were foreign-born was 42% in 1910, 44% In 1920, and 34% in 1930. In 1910 about half of the 25 foreign-born heads of households came from northern Europe and half from the Azores (Portugal). In 1920, the 33 foreign-born came from: Azores – 13, Italy – 3, Japan -1, Canada and northern Europe -16. In 1930, the make up of the 44 foreign-born was: Azores – 6, Italy – 5, Japan – 3, Canada and northern Europe – 27, Latin America – 3.

Other interesting census data: home ownership dropped from 81% in 1920 to 67% in 1930. In 1930, only 53% of the homes had radios. In 1930, 29 residents were war veterans, 3 from the Spanish War, 25 from the World War and 1 from both wars.


If you have comments or questions about this article
or other topics pertaining to the history of Homestead Valley,
please feel free to e-mail Chuck Oldenburg.