Homestead Residents Protest

A Homestead Headlines Article by Chuck Oldenburg

October, 2004

In February, 1920, a group of Homestead citizens met at the residence of Alfred and Fannie Worley on LaVerne Ave. to prepare a statement. The Mill Valley Record published it along with the names of 76 residents who endorsed the statement. It is remarkable that 57% of the total number of households in Homestead at that time were represented. Homestead residents certainly knew how to organize a protest.

The statement concluded, “You to whom this appeal is made: Do your duty. Go to the polls Tuesday, Feb. 24, and vote against formation of the Southern Marin Boulevard District.”

The proposal originated in Willow Camp (Stinson Beach). The objective was to build a boulevard from Bolinas to Manzanita. [An 1892 map shows such a road – it needed upgrading for automobiles -ed.]

Only unincorporated areas would be part of the proposed district. Incorporated towns such as Mill Valley and Sausalito would be excluded. Here are a few excerpts from the statement:

“Homestead would derive no benefit whatsoever from this boulevard, but if the district is created and the boulevard built, the property owners of Homestead will be called upon to help pay the cost of the construction and maintenance of the same, and it is estimated that the taxes in Homestead will be thereby increased by at least one-third and perhaps one-half above the present rate.

“Homestead is urgently in need of better roads. Let Homestead make its own improvements. If other communities desire improvements, let them pay for such improvements themselves, and not ask Homestead to bear part of the cost of the same. To do so is unjust to the people of Homestead. The rate of taxation in Homestead is already very high; in fact, leaving out the incorporated towns, it is the highest in the county. Do not vote to increase your tax rate when you would receive no benefit from the increase.

Let our motto be, ‘The welfare of Homestead first, last and all the time’.”


If you have comments or questions about this article or other topics
pertaining to the history of Homestead Valley,
please feel free to e-mail Chuck Oldenburg.